Does Anyone Know Simple Ways to Create Low Frequency Vibrations? Can a Radio Be Altered to Do It?

Posted under Home gardening advice | 4 Comments

Q: Specifically, I’m looking to make vibrations that are inaudible or almost inaudible to the human ear.  What sorts of home appliances can do this? Oh, my reason? I’m trying to think of a way to discourage my chickens from digging up my garden and have read that many animals can sense and will avoid certain low frequency sounds. Thanks for your advice!

A: While I agree that this may not be very effective at stopping the chickens, if you did want to try, I suspect a mechanical vibrator will be simpler and cheaper than the signal generator, amplifier and speaker option. An approximately 1750RPM motor (a common speed in areas with 60Hz power) with an eccentric weight on the shaft will generate about a 29Hz vibration. This might be hard on the bearings of a general purpose motor, but it might be OK for a short experiment, if it works, purpose built vibration motors are available. powered by Yahoo answers

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4 Responses to “Does Anyone Know Simple Ways to Create Low Frequency Vibrations? Can a Radio Be Altered to Do It?”

  1. mvbirdo Says:

    Radio, no. You need

    1) a signal generator, aka audio generator or function generator.

    2) an amplifier. This could be an high-power audio amplifier such as would be used in a car or home hi-fi system.

    3) a large speaker.

    You can probably borrow these items from an electronics geek. Put the speaker in a closed box, bury it in the ground, and drive the bejeezus out of it with something that won't be too annoying — if you get it below about 25 Hz you'll be able to feel it more than hear it.

    20 Hz at 50 watts will likely produce some strange effects, maybe keeping chickens out of the garden as well. There really is no way to do it with other appliances. Let us know what happens!
    References :

  2. amansscientiae Says:

    I think a solution involving chicken wire will be a lot cheaper and more effective. Animals learn very quickly what does and what does not signal danger. A Rube Goldberg Antichickenator will probably work for a couple of hours or days, after that it's all the same to the chickens and they will be back.
    References :

  3. tinkertailorcandlestickmaker Says:

    While I agree that this may not be very effective at stopping the chickens, if you did want to try, I suspect a mechanical vibrator will be simpler and cheaper than the signal generator, amplifier and speaker option. An approximately 1750RPM motor (a common sped in areas with 60Hz power) with an eccentric weight on the shaft will generate about a 29Hz vibration. This might be hard on the bearings of a general purpose motor, but it might be OK for a short experiment, if it works, purpose built vibration motors are available.
    References :

  4. Brett2010 Says:

    There is a type of VLF speaker called a 'shaker'. I have a couple of these. They were originally used in games, and provided sensory efects to seats and chairs that ppl playing games were sitting in. They could be very effective in this applicaion – though I agree with the comment that perhaps the chickens will get used to it. They need upwards of 20W to be driven correctly.
    References :

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