any tips & some easy plants for a first time gardener?

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I've just purchased my first home & it has a little raised garden in the back. it looks like it might be shaded for part of the day.
what would you recommend for a first time gardener? something easy & low maintenance, but will produce some yummy foods?
any other tips?
thanks!!
also, i don't know how to time it!!
any help is much appreciated!
i'm in the pacific northwest, btw.
(meant to mention that. oops!)

Well, here in the zone 4/5 border vegetable gardening is pretty much done, at least as far as my abilities. I suggest that you start fresh next spring. I find that the reliables in my garden are carrots, peas, beans and radishes. If you happen to be a radish fan, they just go nuts! Both carrots and radishes seem to do best with deep watering fairly spread out as it forces the root (the part we eat) to reach down deep looking for water. Also, pumpkins grow wonderfully. Gardening is never really low maintenance. The area must be prepared and that alone can be a tough job. Then there is weeding (yuck) but give it a go. Start small and then decide if the work involved was too much or if you want to go big! You never know, you might just fall in love with it!

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No Responses to “any tips & some easy plants for a first time gardener?”

  1. lisaravana Says:

    First, if you're in the US find your growing zone.

    http://www.usna.usda.gov/Hardzone/ushzmap.html

    Then, grow plants that are good for your zone only. Plants are usually marked on their label in the store or in catalogs.

    Not knowing where you are, it may be too late for a vegetable garden. There are winter crops for some parts of the country such as lettuces. Otherwise, you could yet plant a fruit tree this fall. It may take a few years to mature and bear fruit.

    I suggest you look for words like 'disease resistant' and 'hardy' in every plant description. Buy only those. Once you become a better gardener you can try more tender plants.
    References :

  2. u r s i Says:

    Aloe vera is eay to plant and maintain. It soean't produce anything to eat, but you will always have a quick medicine readily available for burns, small bleeding like scrapes and cuts. It grows indoors, outdoors, in sunlight or shade, and doesn't need to be watered every day. When you break a piece of to use the gel on the inside just stcik the left over piece back in some dirt and water it to get another plant started. Certain types of aloe plants even grow a tall stalk that will evenutally have a flower on it. It reproduces and spreads on its on, but since it doesn't have to be planted deeply it's not difficult to pull them up and give away.
    References :

  3. jjjenniferrae Says:

    Well, here in the zone 4/5 border vegetable gardening is pretty much done, at least as far as my abilities. I suggest that you start fresh next spring. I find that the reliables in my garden are carrots, peas, beans and radishes. If you happen to be a radish fan, they just go nuts! Both carrots and radishes seem to do best with deep watering fairly spread out as it forces the root (the part we eat) to reach down deep looking for water. Also, pumpkins grow wonderfully. Gardening is never really low maintenance. The area must be prepared and that alone can be a tough job. Then there is weeding (yuck) but give it a go. Start small and then decide if the work involved was too much or if you want to go big! You never know, you might just fall in love with it!
    References :

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